Home » Author Archives: Varsha (page 3)

Author Archives: Varsha

Canadian Economy Points to a Better Second Half of 2014

New Indicators Point to a Better Second Half of 2014 for Canadian Economy

A manufacturing report in Canada and strong employment trends in the United States indicate better economic prospects for Canada in the second half of 2014.

canadian economy

Growth rates of 1.2% in the first quarter and anticipated 2% in the second quarter are well below the predictions made by the Bank of Canada at the beginning of the year. However analysts are suggesting that the second half of 2014 will put the Canadian economy back on track, mainly because the US economy is now leaping into the best stretch of expansion since the 2008-09 recession.

“There are some signs of improvement in the external background, especially the US. About 50% of Canadian manufacturing sales are exported and the bulk of that is going to the United States,” says Nathan Janzen, an economist with the Royal Bank. His bank’s manufacturing purchasing manager’s index for June shot up to 53.5 following consecutive contractions in April and May.

The manufacturing report was uniformly solid with stronger output and new orders providing the biggest boost. New export orders also rose, along with an increase in the backlogs of work and the quantity of purchase indexes.

Evidence of the strong turnaround appeared when private employers in the US added 281,000 jobs last month. According to CIBC economist Andrew Grantham, these strong numbers support the view that the American economy is picking up steam and that growth will likely stay strong in the third and fourth quarters as well.

Read More

Top Ranking in Canada: Alberta Economy

Oil and Gas Sectors Push Alberta Economy to Top Ranking in Canada

As per a report by TD Economics, Alberta will be the only province in Canada to experience annual economic growth of more than 3% in each of the next two years. Alberta is expected to lead the way in 2014 and 2015 with sustained strength in the oil and gas sector along with rising activity in other sectors of the economy.top-ranking-in-canada alberta

Economic growth rate in Alberta is predicted to be 3.5% in 2014 and 3.2% in 2015. Whereas economic growth for Canada is forecast for 2.2% and 2.6% in the next two years.

Alberta is also expected to see improvement in its healthy differential over the forecast period. This would be due to commodity prices remaining at historically high levels.

“With commodity prices expected to hold up at close to current levels, the differential in GDP per capita . . . between the commodity-rich provinces and the rest of Canada is forecast to edge up. In 2015, we estimate Alberta will record GDP per capita at $88,000, an advantage of $35,000 relative to the rest of Canada,” said TD Economics

Read More

Do you like Canada?

Canada is peaceful ,rich and warm ( because of the people). It is a perfect match for me because I love snow and winter. I always walk to work in the snow. I don’t understand and nobody would , why some Americans hate the Universal Health care System. It shows that America needs more love and compassion. If something good benefits everyone, why should I feel miserable as a decent human being? I am so proud to be a Canadian.

I was born in Ontario and now I live in BC and I’ve been in every single province in this country except PEI. I like it. I find that we’re not as uptight and as uninformed as the average US citizen. I find that the US is all about “We’re #1! We’re #1!”. Where as Canada is going “There’s a competition?” Canada has no intent on shoving it people’s faces how cool we think we are. We just want to hang out and drink good beer, watch hockey, and have good conversation with the rest of the world. Maybe that’s why Europeans like us so much – we just say that we’re Canadian, we don’t ram it down their gullets.

Oh yeah, we’re a lot better winners in sports competitions too on a global basis.

Now that doesn’t go to say that if I got a sweet job in the US that I wouldn’t move there. I find that the vast majority of people in the Northern states (i.e. Washington, Vermont, Minnesota, etc.) have similar view

The Climate and Weather of Winnipeg, Manitoba

climate-winnipeg

Winnipeg

Average Daily Maximum Temperature – Minimum – Sunshine – Raindays – Snowdays – Snowdepth – Windspeed

Located in Southern Manitoba, Winnipeg endures very cold and occasionally rather brutal winter temperatures. Canadians in other provinces sometimes refer jokingly to “Winterpeg”, Manitoba.

Winnipeg has a cold continental climate with a short, very warm summer and a long, cold winter. Despite the cold weather, Winnipeg’s skies are among the clearest in Canada and Winnipeg enjoys much sunny weather all year round.

Snow depths of greater than 1 cm are seen on about 132 days each year in Winnipeg, compared with about 10 days each year inVancouver, 35 days in Penticton, 65 days in Toronto, 88 days in Calgary, and 120 days in Ottawa.

Winnipeg has a windy climate, which it owes to its prairie location. There are few natural barriers to prairie winds, allowing them to sweep down from the Arctic in wintertime.

The combination of very low temperatures and high windspeed is dangerous – and can be life threatening. Weather forecasters in Manitoba issue warnings not to venture out in such conditions.

Although Winnipeg endures lower winter temperatures than Toronto, people who live in Winnipeg claim their city’s dry winter cold is more pleasant than the damper cold in Toronto.

Science lends some support to these claims. Toronto is more overcast in winter than Winnipeg, so there is more radiant heating from the sun in Winnipeg than Toronto. Furthermore, the wet snow in Toronto is warmer than the powder snow in Winnipeg and as a result adds more moisture to the air. Moist air carries heat away from the skin more quickly than dry air does, hence Toronto can feel colder than someone from Winnipeg might expect.

The winter air in Winnipeg is so dry that many householders use humidifiers in their homes to add moisture back into the air. Many people feel uncomforable in very dry air, and there can be problems with skin drying and cracking.

Winnipeg, Manitoba

Month
of
year
Av. Daily
Max. Temp.
(°C)
Av. Daily
Min.
Temp. (°C)
Av. hours
Sun
(per day)
Av. Days
with
Rain
Av. Days
with
Snowfall
Av. Depth
Snow on
Ground (cm)
Av. Wind
Speed
(km per hr)
Jan. -13 -23 3.9 1 12 18 17
Feb. -9 -19 4.9 1 8 20 17
Mar. -1 -11 5.8 3 7 13 18
Apr. 10 -2 8.0 5 3 3 18
May 19 5 9.2 11 1 0 18
Jun. 23 11 9.4 13 0 0 16
Jul. 26 13 10.2 11 0 0 15
Aug. 25 12 9.0 10 0 0 15
Sep. 19 6 6.0 11 0 0 17
Oct. 11 0 4.7 8 2 0 18
Nov. -1 -10 3.1 2 9 5 17
Dec. -10 -19 3.2 1 11 10 17

Canada Top 25 Best Places to Live

Top 25 cities:canada

Alberta

Canada’s Best Places to Live 2015: Time to Think Small

The best place to live in Canada is small, really small. It is often assumed that residing in a modest-sized town implies giving up access to most services and amenities you need but it may not be true everywhere. Satellite communities have evolved around major centres to deliver small-town flare with big-city conveniences. Several of these communities aren’t just great places to live: they’re in fact Canada’s best-kept secrets. An example is St. Albert, a community of just 64,000 on the edge of Edmonton. Very few Canadians have likely ever heard of it. But it tops MoneySense’s annual Best Places to Live ranking.

Canada Top 25 Best Places to Live

About half of the top 20 cities on our list are west of Winnipeg. The area offers plenty of opportunities to land high-paying jobs, and the city is fast expanding its transit system and growing its cultural scene. The westward tilt brings some casualties in the east. For instance in Orillia and Owen Sound in Ontario, growth is stagnant and the job outlook is dim.

Many big cities took a step back this year, except for Quebec City, Laval, Que., and Vancouver. A dichotomy is emerging in the La Belle Province, where little-known communities like Boucherville, Lévis and Rimouski are jumping up the list while Montreal sinks towards the bottom.

Several critics point out that we don’t include intangible considerations – like the best scenery or hottest attractions – into our methodology. This is true and we don’t take these things into account because such characteristics aren’t the point of this exercise. This isn’t the ‘best places to visit list’, it’s the ‘best places to live list’. The characteristics we take into account include good access to medical care, low crime, good public transportation and nice weather. And most importantly, the best places to live in Canada have to be affordable. So measures like housing prices, employment and wealth are particularly given the greatest weighting in our methodology.

 

Read More

Climate and Weather of Ottawa, Ontario

ottawa-weatherAverage Daily Maximum Temperature – Minimum – Sunshine – Raindays – Snowdays – Snowdepth – Windspeed

Ottawa lies farther north than Toronto, resulting in significantly colder winters

 Unlike many of Ontario’s cities, Ottawa does not sit on the shores of Lake Ontario. This results in higher summer temperatures in Ottawa but increases the harshness of the winters.

Ottawa has a semi-continental climate, with a warm, humid summer and a very cold winter.

Winters in Ottawa are severe. Snow depths of greater than 1 cm are seen on about 120 days each year compared with about 65 days in Toronto. Much greater depths of snow are also found in Ottawa than Toronto.

Ottawa, like other cities in Ontario, enjoys a sunny climate. Summers usually have a generous number of warm or hot sunny days.

Winters are rather less sunny than in the prairie cities of Calgary and Winnipeg.

Ottawa suffers less smog than Toronto. Air quality can be classed as very good, good, moderate, poor or very poor. In 2012, Ottawa had 29 days of moderate air quality. The rest were good or very good.

Ottawa’s day-to day-weather can be changeable throughout the year.

Ottawa, Ontario

Month
of
year
Av. Daily
Max. Temp.
(°C)
Av. Daily
Min.
Temp. (°C)
Av. hours
Sun
(per day)
Av. Days
with
Rain
Av. Days
with
Snowfall
Av. Depth
Snow on
Ground (cm)
Av. Wind
Speed
(km per hr)
Jan. -6 -15 3.3 4 15 21 14
Feb. -4 -13 4.4 3 11 25 14
Mar. 2 -7 5.2 6 8 20 14
Apr. 11 1 6.3 11 3 2 14
May 19 8 7.4 13 0 0 12
Jun. 24 13 8.4 13 0 0 11
Jul. 26 15 8.9 12 0 0 10
Aug. 25 14 8.0 12 0 0 9
Sep. 20 10 5.7 14 0 0 10
Oct. 12 4 4.4 14 1 0 12
Nov. 5 -2 2.8 11 5 1 13
Dec. -3 -10 2.6 5 13 11 13

Climate and Weather of Montreal, Quebec

montreal-weatherAverage Daily Maximum Temperature – Minimum – Sunshine – Raindays – Snowdays – Snowdepth – Windspeed

Montreal’s climate is rather similar to Ottawa’s; Montreal is a little windier.

Montreal has a semi-continental climate, with a warm, humid summer and a very cold winter.

Winters in Montreal are severe. Snow depths of greater than 1 cm are seen on about 109 days each year compared with about 65 days in Toronto. Much greater depths of snow are also found in Montreal than Toronto.

Comparing with some other Canadian cities, snow depths of greater than 1 cm are seen on about:

10 days each year in Vancouver, 35 days in Penticton, 53 days each year in Windsor, 88 days in Calgary, 120 days in Ottawa, and 132 days in Winnipeg.

Montreal enjoys a sunny climate. Summers usually have a generous number of warm or hot sunny days. Winters are rather less sunny than in the prairie cities of Calgary and Winnipeg.

Like most places in Canada, Montreal’s day-to-day weather can be changeable throughout the year.

Montreal, Quebec

Month
of
y
Av. Daily
Max. Temp.
(°C
Av. Daily
Min.
Tep. (°C)
Av. hours
Sun
per day)
Av. Days
with
Rain
Av. Days
with
Snowfall
Av. Depth
Snow on
Ground (cm)
Av. Wind
Speed
(km per hr)
Jan. -6 -15 3.3 4 16 15 17
Feb. -4 -13 4.4 4 12 18 15
Mar. 2 -7 5.1 7 9 13 16
Apr. 11 1 5.8 11 3 1 16
May 19 8 7.4 13 0 0 14
Jun. 24 13 8.2 13 0 0 13
Jul. 26 16 8.8 12 0 0 12
Aug. 25 14 7.8 12 0 0 11
Sep. 20 9 5.8 12 0 0 12
Oct. 13 3 4.5 13 1 0 14
Nov. 5 -2 2.9 11 6 1 15
Dec. -2 -10 2.6 6 13 8 15

Climate and Weather of Edmonton, Alberta

alberta-weatherAverage Daily Maximum Temperature – Minimum – Sunshine – Raindays – Snowdays – Snowdepth – Windspeed

Located in Alberta, Edmonton has a prairie-steppe type climate.

This means it usually enjoys sunny weather, even in winter, and the majority of precipitation comes in summer.

Edmonton enjoys a dry climate with little of the summer humidity that bothers many people in Ontario.

Even in summer, Edmonton’s nights are rather cool.

Edmonton endures very cold winters, with quite a long snow season.

Snow depths of greater than 1 cm are seen on about 141 days each year in Edmonton compared with about 10 days each year inVancouver, 35 days in Penticton, 65 days in Toronto, 88 days inCalgary, and 120 days in Ottawa.

Although it enjoys high sunshine hours, Edmonton’s weather is often changeable – it is also notoriously difficult to predict in detail from day to day.

Edmonton, Alberta

Month
of
year
Av. Daily
Max. Temp.
(°C)
Av. Daily
Min.
Temp. (°C)
Av. hours
Sun
(per day)
Av. Days
with
Rain
Av. Days
with
Snowfall
Av. Depth
Snow on
Ground (cm)
Av. Wind
Speed
(km per hr)
Jan. -8 -19 3.1 1 11 19 12
Feb. -5 -16 4.4 1 8 21 12
Mar. 1 -10 5.5 1 9 16 12
Apr. 11 -2 7.8 5 4 3 14
May 17 3 8.8 11 1 0 15
Jun. 20 8 9.2 14 0 0 13
Jul. 22 9 9.8 14 0 0 10
Aug. 22 8 8.9 13 0 0 10
Sep. 17 3 6.4 10 1 0 12
Oct. 11 -2 5.2 5 2 1 13
Nov. 0 -11 3.3 1 8 5 11
Dec. -6 -17 2.7 1 10 12 12

Climate and Weather of Calgary, Alberta

calgary_mapAverage Daily Maximum Temperature – Minimum – Sunshine – Raindays – Snowdays – Snowdepth – Windspeed

Located in Southern Alberta, Calgary endures very cold winters, although not as cold as Alberta’s capital city, Edmonton, which lies farther north. Snow depths of greater than 1 cm are seen on about 88 days each year in Calgary compared with about 65 days in Toronto.
Calgary has a prairie-steppe type climate. This means it usually enjoys sunny weather, even in winter, and most of its little rainfall comes in summer. The summer rain is vital for the wheat and grass grown on the prairies.
Calgary has a windy climate which it owes to its prairie location – there are few natural barriers to the wind. At times the wind in Calgary takes the form of a Chinook, a hot, dry, Foehn type wind that blasts down from the Rockies.
In winter, the Chinook can raise the temperature in Calgary by 30 degrees Centigrade in the space of a few hours, providing welcome relief from the often bitter cold.

When the Chinook blows, it can cause rapid thawing of snow to slush. Calgary enjoys a dry climate with little of the summer humidity that bothers many people in Ontario. Even in summer, Calgary’s nights are rather cool. Although it enjoys high sunshine hours, Calgary’s weather is often changeable – it is also notoriously difficult to predict in detail from day to day.

Calgary, Alberta

Month of year Av. Daily Max. Temp. (°C) Av. Daily Min. Temp. (°C) Av. hours Sun (per day) Av. Days with Rain Av. Days with Snowfall Av. Depth Snow on Ground (cm) Av. Wind Speed (km per hr)
Jan. -3 -15 3.8 0 10 6 15
Feb. 0 -12 5.0 0 8 4 15
Mar. 4 -8 5.7 1 9 3 15
Apr. 11 -2 7.3 4 6 1 17
May 16 3 8.2 10 2 0 17
Jun. 20 7 9.3 13 0 0 16
Jul. 23 9 10.2 13 0 0 14
Aug. 23 8 9.1 11 0 0 13
Sep. 18 4 6.9 9 2 0 14
Oct. 12 -1 5.8 4 4 0 15
Nov. 3 -9 4.1 1 8 2 14
Dec. -1 -13 3.6 0 8 4 15

HAIDA GWAII, British Columbia

What’s Happening in 2015: Many of the events and activities this destination has to offer are ongoing and available year-round, such as hiking, surfing and exploring the small communities on the islands of Haida Gwaii. A few time-sensitive exceptions include visitingGwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, for which tours and park passes are only offered between June and September, and attending the annual Edge of the World Music Festival, which runs from August 8-10.

Why You Should Go: Formerly known as the Queen Charlotte Islands, this archipelago off British Columbia’s northwest coast saw its First Nationscitizens officially reclaim the original name — which translates loosely to “islands of the people” — in June 2010. The Haida Heritage Centre in Skidegate houses a must-see collection of regional art and historical artifacts that serve to enrich any visitor’s experience on Haida Gwaii. It provides important background information and celebrates current cultural events. Traditional longhouses and totem poles can be found all over Haida Gwaii, many of them relics although some are still in use today.

Vacay.ca’s Katie Marti writes: “The land is unspoiled and remote in a day and age where all such places seem to have been forever conquered and stolen from the wild. There is no room for pretentions here, and no time for trivialities. Maybe it’s because the islands themselves are so far removed, physically, from the mainland and have, therefore, managed to escape certain elements of modern society. Maybe it’s because the poles and longhouses that line the shores serve as a constant, looming reminder of the ancient ways that refuse to be forgotten. Regardless, this is Haida Gwaii, and to get to know the place and its people, truly and experientially, is nothing short of an honour.”

Join Canada – Apply for tourist visa